Updates from June, 2009 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • derek 10:27 am on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    quiet lightning 

    quiet lightning
    a distant storm
    the city noise drowns out
    what thunder there is
    all i hear is the train
    yards away
    thundering by
    and flashes so bright
    even the city lights
    can’t blind them out
    this street reminds me of Philly
    he said
    red bricks
    weeds
    and a cheesy mural
    painted on the big garage door
    of the piano warehouse
    where we rehearse
    his one man show
    captivating and inspired
    but out the window
    and the corner of my eye
    quite lightning
    the rumble of the city
    a storm passes by

     
    • heath 1:08 pm on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      ah, sweet!

      • derek 11:16 pm on Wednesday, July 1, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        hey Heath

        • heath 3:06 pm on Wednesday, July 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

          commented on Grafediting too just now — the different visual frame gives a slightly different flavor to the read — I believe in cross-posting as an editing tool. 🙂

  • ed 8:57 am on Monday, June 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    “If you lend someone £20, and never see… 

    “If you lend someone £20, and never see that person again; it was probably worth it.”
    —Anonymous

     
    • derek63 11:31 am on Monday, June 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      If you give someone, I don’t have a key for pounds, $20, and get to see them again; it is definitely worth it.

      derek

      • ed 5:34 pm on Monday, June 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        Nice, Derek, ‘give’ is the operative word, as in hand it to…..don’t make an issue of it …….
        even if the receiver does see you as a soft touch 😉

        Yes, subtle, ennit?
        ed

        • Uncle Tree 3:39 am on Saturday, June 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply

          “Neither a lender nor a borrower be.” Benjamin Franklin

          You get what you pay for, whether or not it’s what you wanted.
          To freely give, asking nothing in return, will soon make you broke.
          When you are left with nothing, then will people leave you alone.

          What device? Who’s advise? That’s my vice. I love empty pockets.

  • skkott 2:51 am on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Deepak Chopra, Oprah, Quackery   

    Choprawoo… 

    Orac at Science blogs takes Deepak Chopra to task one more time after Chopra’s recent column criticizing NEWSWEEK’s brilliant cover article on Oprah promoting quackery on her show, “There is, however, one person who may cause Oprah a bit of trouble. Ironically, it’s one of her staunchest supporters. Indeed, it’s someone we’ve met many times before on this blog, and he’s outraged that NEWSWEEK would be so mean to Oprah. Indeed, I’m referring to a man for whom I once coined a term to describe his mystical, magical, pseudoscientific New Age blather. Oprah, meet Chopra. Deepak Chopra, that is. Again.”:

    Oprah and Chopra sittin’ in a tree…

     
    • derek 12:57 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Hey skkott
      Now who were you at IB? I don’t remember. People have used so many names. It’s nice to have another voice here though.

      Funny what people at Oprah and Deepak’s level of fame and recognition have to do to be there and what they have to do to stay there. I can’t imagine . One thing I do know is it takes a lot of people to be their fans and to hold them up. The things they say or try to say, in my opinion, are no more valid than anyone else. If people want to follow them in such a way as to believe whatever they say, then who is more foolish?

      When it comes to ones health and how to treat it, I believe everyone is different. For some it is not the delivery system but their belief in it that helps them. For some people total quackery works just fine and for some people it’s their belief in space age medical technology and some people believe that no medical intervention is best. I personally believe that most doctors and healers are shooting in the dark and hoping something works.

      My Dad was a doctor and my wife is an energy healer, I have seen results and failures in both practices. It really seems to boil down to the individual and how much they truly want to be healed. If someone wants to be healthy they will find a way that works for them. If that’s cutting off a chickens foot and lighting candles, good for them. If it’s getting cat scans and chemotherapy, good for them too. Some people suffer from debilitating illness and it is sad when they can not get the help they need because there are so many limitations put on them by the AMA. Some of those people could get relief from alternative medicine. Some are made worse by alternative medicine but the same can be said about mainstream western medicine as well.

      There is no one type of treatment that works for everyone. We are complex creatures with many variables within our own individual circumstances.

      I don’t know anything about you skkott but if you are trying to help people by educating them, then you should open your heart and allow people to seek what will help them, not diminish treatments that you have not experienced to work in your own personal life. It is often the belief in the treatment and the faith in the person treating them, more than the treatment it’s self, that helps people.

      I read a lot of the comments in Orac’s thread and it’s the same back and forth thing. People from each camp throwing stones at each other, while in the middle are people needing help but getting stones instead.

      There are many types of treatments because there are many types of people.

      derek

    • derek 2:57 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      You know skkott, I don’t think anyone here talks about Oprah or Deepak much at all. Your post was like a throw back to the old IB world, but it was kinda fun. Thanks

      derek

    • heath 6:42 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Dear Scott

      Chopra has valid points. Orac does too. Both have their own agendas, though.

      Reading Orac’s blog, I was struck by his frequent use of judgmental words meant to tell the reader how to feel. That made me uncomfortable with his attitude, even though many of his points are well taken.

      Orac says “Physicians are taught nutrition in medical school; they are taught prevention.” In my experience, doctors are as human and imperfect as the rest of us, and many fail to understand the importance of nutrition and prevention. Some of what they learn is old or incorrect, too. Many docs are susceptible to manipulation by pharma company reps, advertising, and so on.

      My criticism of Chopra is that he’s not as aware as he should be of his own vulnerability to fame and of-the-momentness.

      Personally, I’ve suffered more harm at the hands of doctors than you would expect in this day and age. My most recent misadventure was when an ER orthopedist decided to show off to two female interns by demonstrating how to reduce my dislocated shoulder. Unfortunately, he chose one of the most diffucult reduction maneuvers, my muscles were in spasm already, and he hadn’t practiced the maneuver for a while. Not only did he fail to reduce via the difficult method, he caused me immense pain and chipped my shoulder socket with my humerus when he let the bone go a little too soon and at the wrong angle. He took a 30-minute break, during which I had to have morphine administered because of the increase in pain he’d caused, then he came back with the first technique listed in most discussion of shoulder dislocation reductions, and used it to pop my arm back into its socket in 30 seconds, with no more pain to me. The technique needs three people, and he had to use the two internists. Of course, that took away any superiority he had still been able to maintain with them after his failure get my arm back into my shoulder. The poor guy couldn’t speak to me after he fixed me up, he was so humiliated. The two internists were doing their work with grins on their faces, after he finished up. And this great action took place in an ER, not at a bar or on the beach on the weekend. What price do patients pay for this kind of uneducated behavior? Uneducated in simple humanity, that is. That’s where many alternative medicine practitioners have an edge — because their approach is founded on a humanistic basis. They pay attention to their patients, and most often use conservative methods of treatment that are less likely to do immediate harm. Old methods, too. Many old, conservative methods have lasted through the years simply because they’ve always worked. So why be surprised if they still work even now?

      The prob isn’t with the medicine, it’s with the practitioners. Whenever ego steps between doctor and patient, damage is a likely outcome. Same is true for alternative medicine people. But our culture rewards doctors for egotistic, matlab blind, behavior, while it’s kind of hard on practitioners of alternative medicine. So maybe current social pressures keep alternative medicine more viable and less harmful than traditional medicine, so-called.

      Regarding Oprah, imho she’s been too rich for too long and is way more out of touch with many microrealities that are important to the rest of us than she should be, if she’s acting like a leader — which she is, despite her demurrals, both verbal and otherwise. That’s not any kind of jealousy of her success, on my part. I can feel in my bones that she’s frequently off-base, and I’ve felt it for about ten years.

      love, h

    • ed 5:48 am on Monday, June 15, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Hi skkott,
      give me Bruce Lipton any day….with a tiny pinch of my customary salt 😉

      http://www.brucelipton.com/store/podcast

      We gotta move on….as one. There’s ‘gold’ in them thar ills 😉 The solution is the problem…..scan….

      ed

  • ed 8:26 am on Friday, June 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: free association, idle chatter, Mind, perceptions, wordplay   

    The mind is a chatter-box…. 

    The mind is a chatter-box, the clatter of a cartwheel on cobbled streets, the clicking of a slow train, going over points as duality rails, so, mind the gap, when arriving at the station.
    Truth is just the ticket to ride. Nothing stands still 😉

    As a gardener, my mind reminds me of a cauliflower…..virtually 🙂

     
    • derek 10:28 am on Friday, June 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      My ticket has been punched a few too many times, folded and tattered and doodled upon. If the truth is a ticket, mine has been thoroughly dereked and only valid for one more trip, next stop, Eden, the end of the tracks for me, a full circle from garden to garden. What was all that stuff in between?

      ………she’s gotta a ticket to ride, but she don’t care………

      i’ve got beatles in my garden

      derek

  • heath 7:59 am on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: fiction, , Salman Rushdie   

    Why I love Salman Rushdie 

    In the current New Yorker magazine, there’s a Salman Rushdie story titled In The South, which opens like this:

    “The day that Junior fell down began like any other day: the explosion of heat rippling the air, the trumpeting sunlight, the traffic’s tidal surges, the prayer chants in the distance, the cheap film music rising from the floor below, the loud pelvic thrusts of an “item number” dancing across a neighbor’s TV, a child’s cry, a mother’s rebuke, unexplained laughter, scarlet expectorations, bicycles, the newly plaited hair of schoolgirls, the smell of strong sweet coffee, a green wing flashing in a tree…”

    What puts the knife in my heart?  That he ends the list of urban events and sounds with “…a green wing flashing in a tree.

     
    • derek 10:29 am on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      No matter how urban we get, nature has away of showing through, even if it’s just a glimpse.

      • heath 1:31 pm on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        tiny hillocks of moss, brilliant in the rain, border a narrow squirrel-tamped path edging the parking lot out back…

        • derek 11:22 pm on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply

          is the brilliance in noticing such details of life, or is it in the sharing of them in such a poetic way……

          • ed 1:40 pm on Thursday, June 11, 2009 Permalink | Reply

            What more can anyone say? Cool, you two.

          • heath 4:50 pm on Thursday, June 11, 2009 Permalink | Reply

            the brilliance of the onlooker’s eye sees a green wing flashing in a tree.

            • derek 10:30 am on Friday, June 12, 2009 Permalink

              brilliance upon brilliance and then a star is born

c
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