Updates from July, 2009 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • skkott 9:02 am on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Washington Post behind the numbers: But … 

    Washington Post behind the numbers: But can she cook? “Homemaker” seems to be the best suited job for Palin, according to the public. Yes, that’s right. Only 12% of Republicans think President’s her best next job, and only 4% of independents (6% of the public overall thinks that President should be her next job.)

    Palin – Fox Explores “What Next?”

    Fox News is out with the first “what next?” poll on former governor Sarah Palin: “homemaker” tops the closed-ended list.

    Here’s the full breakdown by party identification…

    Q: What do you think is the best job for Sarah Palin
    now that she has resigned as governor of Alaska?
    
                              All
                             voters   Dem   Rep   Ind
    Homemaker                  32     45     18    34
    Television Talk Show Host  17     21     14    15
    Vice President             14      4     27    11
    College Professor          10     12      7     8
    President                   6      2     12     4
    (Other)                    13     10     12    21
    (Don't know)                8      6     10     8
    
    Source: Fox News poll, July 21-22; +/-3.

    Maureen Dowd:

    As McCain pal and Republican strategist Mike Murphy so sagely observed recently: “If Sarah Palin looked like Golda Meir, would we even be talking about her today?”

    Sarah should follow her own advice to Hillary and work harder to be capable. Until then, she’s all cage, no bird.

    And if she wants to be a “homemaker”, she should learn to cook something other than a mooseburger. Until then, she’s all oven, no cookie. Sarah, you are hot, but all air,  no care &  so unfair! Got no dough? No bake, no cake for ya! You are all fake, all make. Sorry Sarah, for all’s sake, no take! Gee…that was bad. I hope it isn’t as bad as Palin’s poetics.

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  • Dara 8:41 am on Friday, July 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    There are people and then there are people… 

    I am not a great cut and paste artist, but this I have to share. People constantly amaze me with their big hearts and character. This is an extract from an email I just received:


    ‘Last Sunday, my wife, kid, and I had to travel to Andheri from Bandra. When I waved at a passing auto rickshaw, little did I expect that this ride would be any different. As we set off, my eyes fell on a few magazines (kept in an aircraft style pouch) behind the driver’s back rest. I looked in front and there was a small TV. The driver had put on the Doordarshan channel.

    My wife and I looked at each other with disbelief and amusement. In front of me was a small first-aid box with cotton, dettol and some medicines. This was enough for me to realise that I was in a special vehicle. Then I looked round again, and discovered more – there was a radio, fire extinguisher, wall clock, calendar, and pictures and symbols of all faiths – from Islam and C hr istianity to Buddhism, Hinduism and Sikhism. There were also pictures of the heroes of 26/11- Kamte, Salaskar, Karkare and Unnikrishnan. I realised that not only my vehicle, but also my driver was special.

    I started chatting with him and the initial sense of ridicule and disbelief gradually diminished. I gathered that he had been driving an auto rickshaw for the past 8-9 years; he had lost his job when his employer’s plastic company was shut down. He had two school-going children, and he drove from 8 in the morning till 10 at night. No break unless he was unwell. “Sahab, ghar mein baith ke TV dekh kar kya faida? Do paisa income karega toh future mein kaam aayega.” (“Whats the point of sitting at home watching TV. If I earn 2 paise they will come in handy in future”)

    We realised that we had come across a man who represents Mumbai – the spirit of work, the spirit of travel and the spirit of excelling in life. I asked him whether he does anything else as I figured that he did not have too much spare time. He said that he goes to an old age home for women in Andheri once a week or whenever he has some extra income, where he donates tooth brushes, toothpastes, soap, hair oil, and other items of daily use. He pointed out to a painted message below the meter that read: “25 per cent discount on metered fare for the handicapped. Free rides for blind passengers up to Rs. 50.

    My wife and I were struck with awe. The man was a HERO! A hero who deserves all our respect. Our journey came to an end; 45 minutes of a lesson in humility, selflessness, and of a hero-worshipping Mumbai, my temporary home. We disembarked, and all I could do was to pay him a tip that would hardly cover a free ride for a blind man.’

    One day I hope to meet Sandeep Bachhe and see his rick MH-02-Z-8508.

     
  • skkott 2:51 am on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Deepak Chopra, Oprah, Quackery   

    Choprawoo… 

    Orac at Science blogs takes Deepak Chopra to task one more time after Chopra’s recent column criticizing NEWSWEEK’s brilliant cover article on Oprah promoting quackery on her show, “There is, however, one person who may cause Oprah a bit of trouble. Ironically, it’s one of her staunchest supporters. Indeed, it’s someone we’ve met many times before on this blog, and he’s outraged that NEWSWEEK would be so mean to Oprah. Indeed, I’m referring to a man for whom I once coined a term to describe his mystical, magical, pseudoscientific New Age blather. Oprah, meet Chopra. Deepak Chopra, that is. Again.”:

    Oprah and Chopra sittin’ in a tree…

     
    • derek 12:57 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Hey skkott
      Now who were you at IB? I don’t remember. People have used so many names. It’s nice to have another voice here though.

      Funny what people at Oprah and Deepak’s level of fame and recognition have to do to be there and what they have to do to stay there. I can’t imagine . One thing I do know is it takes a lot of people to be their fans and to hold them up. The things they say or try to say, in my opinion, are no more valid than anyone else. If people want to follow them in such a way as to believe whatever they say, then who is more foolish?

      When it comes to ones health and how to treat it, I believe everyone is different. For some it is not the delivery system but their belief in it that helps them. For some people total quackery works just fine and for some people it’s their belief in space age medical technology and some people believe that no medical intervention is best. I personally believe that most doctors and healers are shooting in the dark and hoping something works.

      My Dad was a doctor and my wife is an energy healer, I have seen results and failures in both practices. It really seems to boil down to the individual and how much they truly want to be healed. If someone wants to be healthy they will find a way that works for them. If that’s cutting off a chickens foot and lighting candles, good for them. If it’s getting cat scans and chemotherapy, good for them too. Some people suffer from debilitating illness and it is sad when they can not get the help they need because there are so many limitations put on them by the AMA. Some of those people could get relief from alternative medicine. Some are made worse by alternative medicine but the same can be said about mainstream western medicine as well.

      There is no one type of treatment that works for everyone. We are complex creatures with many variables within our own individual circumstances.

      I don’t know anything about you skkott but if you are trying to help people by educating them, then you should open your heart and allow people to seek what will help them, not diminish treatments that you have not experienced to work in your own personal life. It is often the belief in the treatment and the faith in the person treating them, more than the treatment it’s self, that helps people.

      I read a lot of the comments in Orac’s thread and it’s the same back and forth thing. People from each camp throwing stones at each other, while in the middle are people needing help but getting stones instead.

      There are many types of treatments because there are many types of people.

      derek

    • derek 2:57 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      You know skkott, I don’t think anyone here talks about Oprah or Deepak much at all. Your post was like a throw back to the old IB world, but it was kinda fun. Thanks

      derek

    • heath 6:42 pm on Sunday, June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Dear Scott

      Chopra has valid points. Orac does too. Both have their own agendas, though.

      Reading Orac’s blog, I was struck by his frequent use of judgmental words meant to tell the reader how to feel. That made me uncomfortable with his attitude, even though many of his points are well taken.

      Orac says “Physicians are taught nutrition in medical school; they are taught prevention.” In my experience, doctors are as human and imperfect as the rest of us, and many fail to understand the importance of nutrition and prevention. Some of what they learn is old or incorrect, too. Many docs are susceptible to manipulation by pharma company reps, advertising, and so on.

      My criticism of Chopra is that he’s not as aware as he should be of his own vulnerability to fame and of-the-momentness.

      Personally, I’ve suffered more harm at the hands of doctors than you would expect in this day and age. My most recent misadventure was when an ER orthopedist decided to show off to two female interns by demonstrating how to reduce my dislocated shoulder. Unfortunately, he chose one of the most diffucult reduction maneuvers, my muscles were in spasm already, and he hadn’t practiced the maneuver for a while. Not only did he fail to reduce via the difficult method, he caused me immense pain and chipped my shoulder socket with my humerus when he let the bone go a little too soon and at the wrong angle. He took a 30-minute break, during which I had to have morphine administered because of the increase in pain he’d caused, then he came back with the first technique listed in most discussion of shoulder dislocation reductions, and used it to pop my arm back into its socket in 30 seconds, with no more pain to me. The technique needs three people, and he had to use the two internists. Of course, that took away any superiority he had still been able to maintain with them after his failure get my arm back into my shoulder. The poor guy couldn’t speak to me after he fixed me up, he was so humiliated. The two internists were doing their work with grins on their faces, after he finished up. And this great action took place in an ER, not at a bar or on the beach on the weekend. What price do patients pay for this kind of uneducated behavior? Uneducated in simple humanity, that is. That’s where many alternative medicine practitioners have an edge — because their approach is founded on a humanistic basis. They pay attention to their patients, and most often use conservative methods of treatment that are less likely to do immediate harm. Old methods, too. Many old, conservative methods have lasted through the years simply because they’ve always worked. So why be surprised if they still work even now?

      The prob isn’t with the medicine, it’s with the practitioners. Whenever ego steps between doctor and patient, damage is a likely outcome. Same is true for alternative medicine people. But our culture rewards doctors for egotistic, matlab blind, behavior, while it’s kind of hard on practitioners of alternative medicine. So maybe current social pressures keep alternative medicine more viable and less harmful than traditional medicine, so-called.

      Regarding Oprah, imho she’s been too rich for too long and is way more out of touch with many microrealities that are important to the rest of us than she should be, if she’s acting like a leader — which she is, despite her demurrals, both verbal and otherwise. That’s not any kind of jealousy of her success, on my part. I can feel in my bones that she’s frequently off-base, and I’ve felt it for about ten years.

      love, h

    • ed 5:48 am on Monday, June 15, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Hi skkott,
      give me Bruce Lipton any day….with a tiny pinch of my customary salt 😉

      http://www.brucelipton.com/store/podcast

      We gotta move on….as one. There’s ‘gold’ in them thar ills 😉 The solution is the problem…..scan….

      ed

  • heath 2:25 pm on Friday, May 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: manual labor, Matthew B. Crawford,   

    An old way of looking at new work 

    A new article in the upcoming NY Times Magazine is one of most revolutionary things I’ve ever read from within the American sociocultural environment:

    The Case for Working With Your Hands — by Matthew B. Crawford.

    An excerpt:

    “..After finishing a Ph.D. in political philosophy at the University of Chicago in 2000, I managed to stay on with a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at the university’s Committee on Social Thought. The academic job market was utterly bleak. In a state of professional panic, I retreated to a makeshift workshop I set up in the basement of a Hyde Park apartment building, where I spent the winter tearing down an old Honda motorcycle and rebuilding it. The physicality of it, and the clear specificity of what the project required of me, was a balm….”

     
    • cat 4:56 am on Monday, May 25, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, it’s excellent. I got the link to the article on advrider.com this morning.

      Nothing quite like recognising the truth; something you’d always known, at some level, but never seen expressed so well.

      • heath 11:24 am on Monday, May 25, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        Hi cat. Crawford’s article has struck a deep chord. He has a book coming out, from which the article is drawn. It’s “Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work”, available in hardcover, and download for Kindle, at Amazon.

        love, h

  • heath 12:49 pm on Wednesday, April 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Belfast, Lawrence Downes, Maureen Evans, Northern Ireland, recipes,   

    Food tweets 

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/22/dining/22twit.html — by Lawrence Downes, a piece notable for the tap into the twee gestalt and lovely writing, as well as for the information. Snippet:

    “…I can hear your quibbles. You’re already on the Internet, so why not get the whole recipe, with pictures, and maybe a video? There’s no global shortage of pixels, so why risk clarity and comprehension for the sake of Twitter’s 140-character straitjacket?
    “I have no answer to that, other than to say it’s fun to decode and cook Ms. Evans’s tweets. They’re a pleasure to look at — strangely absorbing, like bonsai or Fabergé eggs. And (not to spoil the surprise) they work…”

     
  • heath 10:45 pm on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: UNESCO, WDL, World Digital Library   

    The World Digital Library (WDL) 

    The web site:  http://www.wdl.org

    A NYTimes Global Edition article about it: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/21/technology/21library.html?_r=1&ref=globalhome

    WDL is a Unesco effort.

     
  • heath 12:11 am on Tuesday, April 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Frederick Seidel, links to others' stuff including mine, , The Cove, WWF magnetic money boards   

    Open, orphan: hugs hugs hugs. Links in… 

    Open, orphan: hugs hugs hugs.
    Links in link: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/warriorpoets/message/13120

     
  • heath 8:16 am on Wednesday, April 8, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2009 gold rush, , , sarcasm   

    Journalistic Sarcasm: Do you like yours … 

    Journalistic Sarcasm: Do you like yours sunny, sharp, and with one warhead pointed back at the author? If so, you’ll appreciate today’s Maureen Dowd column in the NY Times.

    link: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/08/opinion/08dowd.html

    sample: “…The 49ers… stopped in San Francisco, two-and-a-half hours west of here, to buy supplies, such as bullets, salt meat and Levis. (And to buy shady ladies, or ‘soiled doves,’ as they were known, but we won’t get into that.) My San Francisco supplies were more modern: pre-torn jeans, a skim latte, a G.P.S., a cellphone and a laptop to get updates on the price of gold…”

    love, h

     
  • heath 7:58 am on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hawt, stupidity,   

    Ostrich action (head in ground, ass poin … 

    Ostrich action (head in ground, ass pointing heaven-ward), seen at WordPress’s Hawt Post:

    http://bhc3.wordpress.com/2009/03/17/how-to-tweet-your-way-out-of-a-job/

     
  • heath 4:59 pm on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Clive Owen, Duplicity, film direction, PDAs and juries, screenwriting, Tony Gilroy,   

    Short sketches, reversals, and… the In … 

    Short sketches, reversals, and… the Internet, PDA’s and juries…

    Am trying to write short stories so I can tighten my story sensibility before I go back to work on the book. Wrote two rough ones on the morning commute. Inspired by what I read about Tony Gilroy two days ago, some conversations with my son, and the way a special guy I know and love does his creative work.

    If you’re into writing, film direction, screenwriting, check the New Yorker’s profile of Tony Gilroy, whose forthcoming film Duplicity should be really good, not the least because Clive Owen is the male lead. D.T. Max’s profile of Gilroy is here:
    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/03/16/090316fa_fact_max
    Wiki page for Duplicity:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duplicity_(film)

    Here’s a grim yet funny irony… did you ever think that what your kids are doing with their PDA’s could also be done by juries with their PDA’s? With resulting confusion in and subversion of the American judicial system?
    Here’s the story:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/18/us/18juries.html

    love, h

     
  • heath 6:15 pm on Monday, March 16, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: City Room Blog, counterfeiting, hidden downsizing, morality, , tuna sandwich, unemployment   

    The NYTimes has a lot of interesting stu … 

    The NYTimes has a lot of interesting stuff going on. One of my fav’s is the City Room blog, here:
    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com

    Today there’s “Fired Over a Tuna Sandwich, and Fighting Back”, a sad story, where justice of a personal kind prevailed, but a larger social justice didn’t:
    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/16/fired-over-a-tuna-sandwich-and-fighting-back/

    and “The Moral Costs of Counterfeiting”, with some surprising thoughts:
    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/16/the-moral-costs-of-counterfeiting/

     
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